The man whom once, Melpomene,
Thou look’st on with benignant sight,
Shall never at the Isthmus be
A boxer eminent in fight,
Nor fares he foremost in the flight
Of Grecian cars to victory,
Nor goes with Delian laurels dight,
The man thou lov’st, Melpomene!
Not him the Capitol shall see,
As who hath crush’d the threats and might
Of monarchs, march triumphantly;
But Fame shall crown him, in his right
Of all the Roman lyre that smite
The first; so woods of Tivoli
Proclaim him, so her waters bright,
The man thou lov’st, Melpomene!
The sons of queenly Rome count ME,
Me too, with them whose chants delight, -
The poets’ kindly company;
Now broken is the tooth of spite,
But thou, that temperest aright
The golden lyre, all, all to thee
He owes–life, fame, and fortune’s height -
The man thou lov’st, Melpomene!
ENVOY.
Queen, that to mute lips could’st unite
The wild swan’s dying melody!
Thy gifts, ah! how shall he requite -
The man thou lov’st, Melpomene?



 

***

Other Poems by Andrew Lang

Andrew Lang’s page

 


Andrew Lang
Latest posts by Andrew Lang (see all)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *